7 Fake Words That Ended Up in the Dictionary | Mental Floss

I love words. I love etymologies and origins and how things got to mean what they mean today and how that has changed from what they meant yesterday or last week. Over at Mental Floss, they have this article, 7 Fake Words That Ended Up in the Dictionary, which now has me asking the obvious question: if a “fake word” ends up in the dictionary, does that not, by definition, make it a real word? And if so, can we bring these words into everyday parlance? If not, what’s to say that any word is “real?” Remember those lists of words we should “bring back?” Maybe those are fake, too?

Candy corn: Halloween’s most contentious sweet, explained – Vox

People have been loving — and loving to hate — the tricolored candy for more than a century. Vox’s piece, Candy corn: Halloween’s most contentious sweet, explained, gives you the rundown and history of this, one of my top five all-time favorite candy treats (Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups are far and away the front-runner with a few others like Twix and Whatchamacallit in there for good measure – straight up chocolate bars are in their own category). And just to keep things even, here’s Atlas Obscura on the subject.

100 Best Horror Novels And Stories : NPR

Who doesn’t like to be scared?

Okay, sure, lots of people don’t. But in case you’re not one of them, NPR has once again taken an informal and completely non-scientific poll to find the 100 Best Horror Novels And Stories. Naturally, they did it this year, 2018, since it marks the 200th anniversary of the original publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Continue reading “100 Best Horror Novels And Stories : NPR”